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Germany is sending heavy weapons to a conflict zone for the first time since World War II. The United Kingdom has committed anti-ship, anti-tank, and anti-aircraft missiles. The United States, the Netherlands, the Czech Republic, Slovakia—the list goes on.

This is the point where someone should be pausing to ask—is this deluge of arms going to result in the peace the Ukrainian people need and deserve?

As Russia continues its offensive, allies are responding by funneling more and more weapons into Ukraine.

The urge to do something—anything—to stop the horrifying violence unfolding in Ukraine is deeply understandable. But this is the point where someone should be pausing to ask—is this deluge of arms going to result in the peace the Ukrainian people need and deserve?

It often feels like engaging militarily is the only way to end conflict. But if we have learned anything from the last 20 years of the war on terror, it’s that military gains are short-lived and exact a high human, financial, and moral cost.

The path we’re on brings us dangerously closer to nuclear war and global annihilation. We must do everything we can to help the parties agree to a ceasefire and lay the groundwork for enduring peace.

We must do everything we can to help the parties agree to a ceasefire and lay the groundwork for enduring peace.

This week, the Biden administration sent a request to Congress asking for additional money to sustain the U.S. response in Ukraine. This emergency spending bill is meant to fund U.S. military, economic, and humanitarian assistance through Sept. 30, the end of the fiscal year.

U.S. leaders have many non-violent policy options available to help save lives and advance peace—and that’s where this money should be directed.

Lawmakers need to understand that using diplomacy, working through multilateral institutions, supporting local peacebuilders, providing humanitarian aid, and protecting refugees are not “weak” responses. These are our best tools for bringing about a durable solution to the crisis.

Jessie Palatucci

Jessie Palatucci

Senior Digital Communications Manager
Jessie Palatucci manages FCNL’s digital advocacy program and web communications. She writes extensively for FCNL’s digital publications and communicates with advocates throughout the U.S.