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The Amazon is burning. Fires are blazing at record rates through the carbon-rich rain forest, known as the “lungs of the earth.”

The impacts of these fires will be felt and seen immediately in Brazil, but their effects will extend far beyond the Amazon region. Few things underscore the interconnected nature of our humanity more.

World leaders and young activists are paving the way. The U.S. Congress must join the global community in developing fair and effective policies to address climate change.

Globally our forests absorb 2.3 billion metric tons of carbon per year. The Amazon alone holds a quarter of that. As the rainforest is further impacted by changing weather patterns and deforestation, its ability to function as a carbon sink is reduced. Without it, our power to address climate change is greatly diminished.

On August 25, world leaders will gather in France for the 45th G7 summit. Today, French President Emmanuel Macron urged his fellow leaders to place the massive fires at the top of their agenda. At the same time, young people around the world are busy organizing global climate strikes and a week of action (September 20-27) to demand action and climate justice for all.

World leaders and young activists are paving the way. The U.S. Congress must join the global community in developing fair and effective policies to address climate change. The movement for change is building. We know that the climate crisis can only be solved if we work together.

Jessie Palatucci

Jessie Palatucci

Senior Digital Communications Manager
Jessie Palatucci manages FCNL’s digital advocacy program and web communications. She writes extensively for FCNL’s digital publications and communicates with advocates throughout the U.S.

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