Joe D'Antonio

Program Assistant, Criminal Justice and Election Integrity


Joe D'Antonio

Joe D’Antonio is the Program Assistant for Criminal Justice and Election Integrity. His primary responsibilities include lobbying members of Congress, writing policy updates, and conducting legislative research.

He earned a B.A. in politics from the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. At Catholic, he was one of the founding members of the school’s radio station where he served as the station manager. Prior to joining FCNL, Joe interned with the National Association of Development Administrations and in the D.C. office of Rep. Brendan Boyle (PA-2).

Joe was born and raised in West Chester, Pennsylvania. When he’s not working, Joe enjoys reading, writing, and going out with friends.

Articles by Joe D'Antonio

Update Our Hopes and Fears for the 2020 State of the Union 

Between the escalation with Iran and the impeachment hearings, Congress has been abuzz with activity so far this year—and advocates have been hard at work, too. The president’s State of the Union address, set for Feb. 4, will serve as an important point of reflection for FCNL and all those working to create change in Congress.

Statement The Only America We Know Is an America at War 

As young adults, we only faintly remember what life was like before Sept. 11, if we remember at all. Since the U.S. invaded Afghanistan, we have made it through elementary, middle, and high school. We’ve applied to colleges, finished our degrees, moved away from home, and entered the workforce—and the entire time, the U.S. has been carrying out military actions halfway across the world.

Update Education Can Restore Hope for Incarcerated Individuals 

Updated Oct. 29, 2019

The 1994 crime bill, formally known as the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act, reframed the U.S. attitude towards criminal justice. Instead of compassion and rehabilitation, the focus shifted towards being “tough on crime.” Through numerous cuts and changes, the 1994 crime bill extended this “toughness” to the treatment of our incarcerated population. One target of the bill was education: After 1994, incarcerated individuals could no longer access Pell Grants.

Update The VRAA Can Turn the Tides on Voter Discrimination 

Ever since the 2013 Supreme Court decision of Shelby County v. Holder, it has been far too easy for voting discrimination to occur. This troubling trend is what led the House Judiciary Committee to hold a hearing on Sept. 10 that focused on voting discrimination and a crucial piece of legislation: The Voting Rights Advancement Act (VRAA).

Background Support For the REAL Act is Everywhere 

The REAL Act is a bipartisan bill that seeks to restore access to Pell Grants for incarcerated individuals. Ending this ban would help to unlock the potential of incarcerated individuals across the nation and help them to achieve personal and career success, while simultaneously lowering the societal costs of recidivism. Below are quotes of support from lawmakers, the secretary of education, and activists from across the political spectrum as well as individuals who benefited from Pell Grants while incarcerated.