Nuclear Weapons

Advocacy for Disarmament and Nonproliferation

Charles Levy / National Archives

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With the end of the Cold War, many dared hope that the scourge of nuclear weapons would be ended once and for all. Yet, today, more than two decades later, the drive to build nuclear weapons by some governments continues, energized in no small part by the policies of the U.S. government.

Nuclear Calendar 

Read a weekly update of national and international events related to nuclear weapons and proliferation issues, which is emailed to more than 14,000 people each week.

Featured

  1. Legislative Ask Support Extension of the New START Nuclear Treaty with Russia 

    The 2010 New START Treaty between the U.S. and Russia limits each country to 700 deployed strategic-range nuclear delivery vehicles (intercontinental ballistic missiles, submarine-launched ballistic missiles, and heavy bombers) and 1,550 warheads on those delivery vehicles.

  2. Update In the Shadow of the Coronavirus, Fate of New START Remains Unclear 

    As the COVID-19 pandemic disrupts our lives and occupies the bulk of our attention, the status of a key pact—the New START nuclear arms control treaty between the United States and Russia—hangs in the air.

  3. Update Hearing Emphasizes Bipartisan Support for Extending New START 

    At a House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing on Dec. 4, a distinguished slate of national security experts delivered a strong message: The U.S. should extend the New START nuclear arms control treaty with Russia before it expires 14 months from now.

More on Nuclear Disarmament & Nonproliferation

Press Release Abandoning the Open Skies Treaty Is a Mistake  

Washington, DC – The Friends Committee on National Legislation (FCNL) expressed disappointment in today’s Trump Administration announcement that it will withdraw from the long-standing, multilateral Treaty on Open Skies. Formal termination will be effective in six months.

Update In the Shadow of the Coronavirus, Fate of New START Remains Unclear 

As the COVID-19 pandemic disrupts our lives and occupies the bulk of our attention, the status of a key pact—the New START nuclear arms control treaty between the United States and Russia—hangs in the air.

Legislative Ask Stop the New Intercontinental Ballistic Missile 

Congress should stop the Ground Based Strategic Deterrent missile before it’s too late.

The United States currently fields 400 nuclear-tipped Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) in land-based silos at Malmstrom, Minot, and Warren Air Force bases stretching across Montana, North Dakota, Wyoming, Nebraska, and Colorado. Despite a recently-completed, multibillion-dollar, decade-long program to extend these missiles’ service life, the Air Force is moving ahead with plans to develop a new, replacement ICBM—the Ground Based Strategic Deterrent (GBSD).

Update The President’s Budget is Out: Here are Five Areas of Concern 

Perhaps the best thing that can be said about President Trump’s budget request for Fiscal Year 2021 is that Congress will likely ignore it.

Legislative Ask Support Extension of the New START Nuclear Treaty with Russia 

The 2010 New START Treaty between the U.S. and Russia limits each country to 700 deployed strategic-range nuclear delivery vehicles (intercontinental ballistic missiles, submarine-launched ballistic missiles, and heavy bombers) and 1,550 warheads on those delivery vehicles.

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