1. Update
  2. Peacebuilding

House Committee Moves to Prevent Violence

By Ben Rowles, April 12, 2019


The bipartisan Global Fragility Act (H.R. 2116) just passed out of the House Foreign Affairs Committee. Next, the full House and the Senate will take up this critical peacebuilding legislation.

Last month a strong bipartisan coalition introduced the bill in the both chambers of Congress. The version that passed out of the House Foreign Affairs Committee has been strengthened to require that all authorized funding be limited to peaceful economic and development initiatives. By passing the Global Fragility Act out of committee, the House demonstrated that there is strong bipartisan support among legislators for peaceful, preventive solutions to prevent violent conflict and build peace.

Tell Congress:

Support the Global Fragility Act of 2019

Act Now 

Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Eliot Engel (NY-16), Ranking Member Michael McCaul (TX-10), and Rep. Ilhan Omar (MN-05) spoke in support of the bill during committee markup.

“I want to express my strong support for H.R.2116, the Global Fragility Act,” Omar said. “Conflict prevention and support for fragile states should be the forefront of our foreign policy.”

Committee passage is just the first step, now the bill moves to the House floor for a vote and similar legislation in the Senate introduced by Sens. Chris Coons (DE) and Lindsey Graham (SC) still needs to be considered by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

Send a message to your senators and representatives urging them to support the Global Fragility Act.

Update New Bipartisan Legislation to Prevent Violent Conflict 

A strong bipartisan coalition in Congress just introduced the Global Fragility Act (H.R.2116, S.727). The bill, if enacted, would require the Secretary of State to launch a government-wide initiative to “stabilize conflict-affected areas and prevent violence and fragility globally.”

Ben Rowles

  • Program Assistant, Peacebuilding

Ben Rowles supports FCNL’s lobbying efforts to change U.S. foreign policy from one that is overly militarized to one that prevents, mitigates, and transforms violent conflict. Ben also facilitates the work of the Prevention and Protection Working Group, a group of organizations dedicated to reducing violent crisis, preventing mass atrocities, and protecting civilians threatened by such crises. Previously, Ben interned with the State Department in Washington, D.C., and at the American Embassy in Mongolia. He holds a B.A. in English from the Pennsylvania State University, where he served as president of the Human Rights Brigades chapter.