Anthony Wier

Legislative Secretary, Nuclear Disarmament and Pentagon Spending


Anthony Wier

Anthony is our lead lobbyist and the director of FCNL's work on nuclear weapons policy and is the key team leader working on our efforts to rein in Pentagon spending. He is also responsible for maintaining FCNL’s Nuclear Calendar and for representing FCNL with the various coalitions that work on these issues.

Prior to joining FCNL in May 2017, Anthony worked for ten years for Congress and the State Department on nuclear nonproliferation issues and international security policy. His most recent experience prior to FCNL was at the U.S. Department of State where he was Deputy Assistant Secretary in the Bureau of Legislative Affairs running a 20 person team guiding State Department interactions with Congress. Before that he worked on nonproliferation issues on the Secretary of State’s Policy Planning Staff.

Anthony also worked as a Senior Professional Staff Member on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee where he helped craft and negotiate the resolution and accompanying committee report providing Senate advice and consent to ratification of the New START treaty and provided advice to the committee on nonproliferation, nuclear weapons issues, international nuclear cooperation, international arms sales, and export controls.

Anthony’s substantial resume also includes time as a Research Associate at the Project on Managing the Atom at Harvard University and, before that, as a Program Examiner at the Office of Management and Budget International Affairs Division. He has a Masters of Public Affairs and a Masters of Arts in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies from the University of Texas at Austin.

Articles by Anthony Wier

Update Opposition Grows as Congress Votes Money for New Nukes 

The House and Senate voted in late June to build a new nuclear warhead that our military does not need and that make our world less safe. The debate over military policy and nuclear weapons spending bills provides a window into growing concerns among Democrats and Republicans over Congressional review of nuclear weapons policy.

Update Korea Talks – Progress and Now Comes the Hard Part 

The agreement President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un signed in Singapore today to take steps toward denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula and a lasting peace agreement is a hopeful first step toward reducing the possibility of war.

Update Military Policy Bill Moves to the Senate 

Just before Memorial Day, the House passed its initial version of the bloated annual National Defense Authorization Act—the main military policy bill that Congress approves every year.

Update What We're Reading on North Korea 

It’s easy to become overwhelmed with the constant stream of rapidly changing news about North Korea. However, we’ve assembled these articles to offer you important context and perspectives on the current crisis, demonstrating the consequences for choosing war and the opportunities possible with diplomacy.

Update President Trump’s Decision to Cancel Korea Summit Is a Mistake 

President Donald Trump’s decision to cancel the planned June 12 meeting with Kim Jong Un in Singapore is a huge mistake that increases the risk of war. We are particularly alarmed by the open allusions to the use of nuclear weapons by both the North Koreans and the United States. This loose talk of nuclear war undermines diplomacy and reflects a careless disregard for the real cost of any military conflict on the Korean peninsula.

Update Keeping Faith in Diplomacy with North Korea 

Truth be told, the past few days have worried me too. I had been encouraged this spring to see South Korea’s diplomacy open new possibilities. As someone who has focused a career on nuclear proliferation, I was happy to express my thanks and praise when President Trump embraced direct engagement to deal with North Korea’s nuclear weapons.

Initial House Defense Policy Bill Raises Concerns 

On May 9, the House Armed Services Committee overwhelmingly backed an initial version of the annual National Defense Authorization Act setting policy prescriptions and spending targets for over $700 billion of military activity for the fiscal year starting this October. The full House will likely consider, tweak, and ultimately approve a version of the bill the week of May 21.

FCNL Joins With 21 Other NGOs to Oppose Low-Yield Nuclear Weapons  

On May 4, FCNL and 21 other organizations wrote to the Senate asking it to deny funding for a dangerous and destabilizing new "low-yield" nuclear warhead for the Navy's submarine launched ballistic missile that would increase the chances of nuclear war. Read the letter below.

Statement A Remarkable and Hopeful Korean Summit 

The historic April 27 meeting of the Korean leaders may not yet herald the end of all tension and strife on the long-troubled peninsula—but it does promise a bold, encouraging new beginning. It has opened a way to peace that has not existed for decades.

Statement FCNL Supports Diplomatic Engagement with North Korea 

FCNL applauds President Trump for agreeing to meet with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un in May. A summit alone is not a solution -- but it is a start.