Andre Gobbo, Domestic Policy Associate, FCNL

Andre Gobbo adds capacity to the Domestic Policy team by handling constituent queries, writing action alerts and sign-on letters, assisting with lobbying visits, creating informational content, supporting coalition relationships, and helping execute FCNL’s legislative strategies. He primarily works on issues relating to economic justice and gun violence prevention but also assists other domestic policy initiatives. He also serves as the co-chair of the Policy & Advocacy subcommittee within the Faiths United to Prevent Gun Violence coalition.

Prior to joining FCNL, Andre worked at Issue One, a nonprofit focused on campaign finance and ethics reform, where he managed their databases, wrote and edited emails to donors and stakeholders, updated collateral and other materials, and planned events. Before moving to Washington, DC Andre lived and worked in Boston, spending time at various organizations like Brookline High School, Northern Light Productions, WGBH, and The Borgen Project. Andre received an MPA from the Maxwell School at Syracuse University and a BA in Politics from Bates College.

In his free time, Andre enjoys riding his bike when the weather cooperates, listening to live music, and playing pond hockey

Articles by Andre Gobbo

Statement FCNL Submits Comment Opposing Citizenship Question in 2020 Census 

The Trump Administration has been seeking to add a question to the 2020 Census that would ask respondents to indicate whether they are a citizen of the United States or not. The proposed rule would go through the Department of Commerce, and would change how the Census intakes information.

Advocacy Resource DHN Releases Pivot Planning Document on Poverty in U.S. 

Poverty still remains a prevalent issue in the U.S., particularly for communities of color. Millions of people remain far from their potential, often living on incomes too low to afford the basics, even if they work.

Update Update: Where the Farm Bill Stands Now 

On Thursday, June 28, the Senate passed H.R. 2, the Agriculture and Nutrition Act, better known as the Senate farm bill. The bill passed by an overwhelming vote of 86-11 and without any harmful amendments. This was a huge victory.

Advocacy Resource June is Gun Violence Awareness Month 

The month of June is Gun Violence Awareness Month, with a day of action taking place across the country on June 2nd. In preparation for this, we’re compiling some of our own resources as well as materials and information from coalition members and outside organizations that are getting involved.

The Farm Bill: What Happens Now?  

On Friday, May 18, the U.S. House of Representatives voted down H.R. 2, the Agriculture and Nutrition Act of 2018, or the House Farm Bill by a vote of 198-238. This bill would have caused more than 2 million Americans to see their Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly food stamps) benefits cut or eliminated entirely. Furthermore, it would have created a massive new bureaucracy that would have overwhelmed states, prevented individuals from accessing benefits, and implemented even stricter work requirements, locking people out of the program if they couldn’t comply.

Statement FCNL Submits Comment to USDA on Proposed Work Requirements for SNAP 

FCNL submitted a comment to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) about a new rule that was recently proposed. The rule would place new requirements on Able-Bodied Adults Without Dependents (ABAWDs) within the SNAP program, and would place restrictions on their access to SNAP benefits.

Statement Prayers and Policy for Gun Violence Prevention 

On Valentines Day we watched in horror as another mass shooting unfolded in the United States, this time at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. The time for thoughts and prayers without action is over. We need you to urge Congress to act.

Background Why Work Requirements Don't Work 

As Congress plans their legislative goals for the year, we’ve heard certain elected leaders mention that they want to achieve “welfare reform” in 2018. While the term may sound harmless, in reality it acts as a vehicle for elected officials to strip benefits from those who rely on government programs like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Medicaid.