1. Press Release
  2. Peacebuilding

Sixty Groups Call for Passage of Senate Bill to Prevent Genocide and Atrocities

Groups Declare Prevention Saves Lives, Protects U.S. Security

February 26, 2016


Sixty organizations called on the Senate today to pass the bipartisan Genocide and Atrocities Prevention Act as a step toward saving lives, protecting United States security and developing long-term solutions to violent conflicts.

Contact:

Theo Sitther -- theo@fcnl.org 202-465-6642 (cell)
Allyson Neville-Morgan -- allyson@fcnl.org 202-368-9387

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Washington, D.C. – Sixty organizations called on the Senate today to pass the bipartisan Genocide and Atrocities Prevention Act as a step toward saving lives, protecting United States security and developing long-term solutions to violent conflicts.

“We – the undersigned human rights, humanitarian, faith, anti-genocide, peace and other organizations – support the Genocide and Atrocities Prevention Act of 2016, S.2551, introduced by Senators Ben Cardin (D-Md.), Thom Tillis (R-N.C.) and their colleagues,” the statement declares. Among the signers are the Friends Committee on National Legislation, Enough Project, Invisible Children, Jewish World Watch, Mercy Corps, National Council of Churches, Oxfam America, U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, and United to End Genocide.

Threats to U.S. security and interests can be mitigated with robust investments in early prevention.

“Preventing genocide and mass atrocities is a core national security interest of the United States,” declare the groups. According to the statement, the outbreak of violent conflict and atrocities has “resulted in increased instability with long-term consequences for countries and regions around the world, feeding into the possibility for repeated and expanded cycles of violence.” However, “these threats to U.S. security and interests can be mitigated with robust investments in early prevention.”

The legislation authorizes the Atrocities Prevention Board, establishes the Complex Crises Fund, requires training for Foreign Service Officers in violent conflict and atrocities prevention, and requires reporting from both the Department of State and Director for National Intelligence. The groups find “these are critical tools that are needed to prevent violent conflict and save lives.”

The full list of cosponsors of this legislation includes Ben Cardin (D-Md.), Thom Tillis (R-N.C.), Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.), Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), Robert Casey (D-Pa.), Chris Coons (D-Del.), Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), Ed Markey (D-Mass.), Robert Menendez (D-N.J.), Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.), Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.), Chris Murphy (D-Conn.), Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.), and Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.).


Full Statement of Support

We – the undersigned human rights, humanitarian, faith, anti-genocide, peace and other organizations – support the Genocide and Atrocities Prevention Act of 2016, S.2551, introduced by Senators Ben Cardin (D-Md.), Thom Tillis (R-N.C.) and their colleagues.

The bill authorizes the Atrocities Prevention Board, establishes the Complex Crises Fund, requires training for Foreign Service Officers in violent conflict and atrocities prevention, and requires reporting from both the Department of State and Director for National Intelligence. These are critical tools that are needed to prevent violent conflict and save lives.

Preventing genocide and mass atrocities is also a core national security interest of the United States. Right now, over 60 million people have been displaced by conflict worldwide - the highest number since World War II. This has required growing expenditures to support life-saving humanitarian assistance and has led to other cost-intensive interventions. These crises have also resulted in increased instability with long-term consequences for countries and regions around the world, feeding into the possibility for repeated and expanded cycles of violence. These threats to U.S. security and interests can be mitigated with robust investments in early prevention.

We believe that the Genocide and Atrocities Prevention Act will save money, and help address the root causes and drivers of violent conflict.

We urge Congress to quickly consider and pass the Genocide and Atrocities Prevention Act.

  1. Africa Faith & Justice Network – Washington, D.C.
  2. Alliance for Peacebuilding – Washington, D.C.
  3. American Jewish Committee – New York, N.Y.
  4. Armenian National Committee of America – Washington, D.C.
  5. Armenian Orthodox Church
  6. The Auschwitz Institute for Peace and Reconciliation – New York, N.Y.
  7. Better World Campaign – Washington, D.C.
  8. CANDLES Holocaust Museum and Education Center – Terre Haute, Ind.
  9. Carl Wilkens Fellowship – National
  10. Charity & Security Network – Washington, D.C.
  11. Church of the Brethren Office of Public Witness – Washington, D.C.
  12. Church World Service – Global
  13. Citizens for Global Solutions – Washington, D.C.
  14. Colorado Coalition for Genocide Awareness and Action – Denver, Colo.
  15. Conference of Major Superiors of Men – Silver Spring, Md.
  16. Darfur Action Group of South Carolina – Columbia, S.C.
  17. Darfur and Beyond – Phoenix, Ariz.
  18. Disciples Center for Public Witness – Washington, D.C.
  19. The Educators' Institute for Human Rights – New York, N.Y.
  20. Enough Project – Washington, D.C.
  21. Franciscan Action Network –Washington, D.C.
  22. Friends Committee on National Legislation – Washington, D.C.
  23. Georgia Coalition to Prevent Genocide – Atlanta, Georgia
  24. Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect – New York, N.Y.
  25. Humanity United – San Francisco, Calif.
  26. i-ACT – Redondo Beach, Calif.
  27. International Coalition for the Responsibility to Protect – Global
  28. International Justice Project – Newark, N.J.
  29. Invisible Children – Washington, D.C.
  30. Jewish Federation of Greater Austin – Austin, Texas
  31. Jewish World Watch – Encino, Calif.
  32. Justice and Peace Committee Sisters of St Francis of Philadelphia – Aston, Penn.
  33. Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns – Washington, D.C.
  34. Mercy Corps – Portland, Ore.
  35. Minnesota Peace Project – Minn.
  36. Missionary Oblates Justice, Peace and Integrity of Creation Office – Washington, D.C.
  37. National Advocacy Center of the Sisters of the Good Shepherd – Silver Spring, Md.
  38. National Council of Churches, USA – Washington, D.C.
  39. Never Again Coalition – Portland, Ore.
  40. NYC Genocide Prevention Coalition – New York, N.Y.
  41. Operation Broken Silence – Memphis, Tenn.
  42. Oxfam America – Boston, Mass.
  43. Pax Christi International – Washington, D.C.
  44. Pax Christi USA – Washington, D.C.
  45. Peace Alliance – Washington, D.C.
  46. Presbyterian Church (USA) – Washington, D.C.
  47. Project C.U.R.E. – Denver, Colo.
  48. Refugee and Immigration Ministries, Christian Church, (Disciples of Christ) – National, Office in Washington, D.C.
  49. Refugees International – Washington, D.C.
  50. The Resolve LRA Crisis Initiative – Washington, D.C.
  51. San Antonio Coalition Against Genocide – San Antonio, Texas
  52. San Francisco Bay Area Darfur Coalition – San Francisco, Calif.
  53. Search for Common Ground – Global, Headquarters in Washington, D.C. and Brussels, Belgium
  54. Sisters of Mercy of the Americas, Institute Justice Team – Silver Spring, Md.
  55. STAND: The Student-Led Movement to End Mass Atrocities – Washington, D.C.
  56. Stop Genocide Now – Los Angeles, Calif.
  57. Student Peace Alliance – Washington, D.C.
  58. Sudan Advocacy Action Forum – Birmingham, Ala.
  59. Union for Reform Judaism – New York, N.Y.
  60. Unitarian Universalist Service Committee – Cambridge, Mass.
  61. United Church of Christ, Justice and Witness Ministries – Washington, D.C.
  62. United Methodist Church, General Board of Church and Society – Washington, D.C.
  63. United Nations Association of the USA – Washington, D.C.
  64. United to End Genocide – Washington, D.C.
  65. U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants – Arlington, Va.
  66. World Relief – Baltimore, Md.
  67. World Without Genocide at Mitchell Hamline School of Law – St. Paul, Minn.

Updated July 7, 2016